Meeting Notes, April 28, 2016

At today’s meeting Loretta, Dave, Tim, Diane, Lisa, Bill, Linda, Ward, Jerry, Annie, Jeanie, Jeanne, Susan K, Mike, Tedd, Eunice, Kristina, Tom D, Dotty, Anna, Joanne, Sandy, Sharon, and me Celeste.

Today suggested table topic: Backlighting. Do you have a sample of your work that is backlit (or someone else’s)? What can you tell us about backlighting?

Celeste: I thought at first I wouldn’t have many examples of backlighting, but as it turns out I have quite a few. I like high contrast and when things are backlit high contrast is often what you get. I brought in three of my paintings that are backlit or in one case rim lighted. I brought in James Gurney’s book.

Loretta: I love backlighting. I am particularly drawn to it. I don’t have any samples to show you. ..but I can tell you that I really favor it.

Dave: I like it too. I especially liked like how the Masters did it! Craig Srebnik had something that he would say about how "if you have only one instrument playing solo that will make your case". In other words, sometimes something simple is all the drama required. I brought in two examples.

Tim: Backlighting is pretty when you get it right and it is not so great when you don’t (laughter)! I brought in a recent plein air.

Diane: I love backlighting and I brought in one in particular that I know is successful. I am going to frame it. When you paint something that is backlit you are painting more of the atmosphere than an object. I brought in a 2nd painting, a nocturne.

Lisa: I brought in a painting that I consider sort of a failure. I think it has too many lines in it making it seem more of a photograph than a painting to me! (Editors note: Is it ok to disagree? --it’s a great painting).

Bill: I brought in a painting that I’ve been working on from Calistoga, California. Here is some trivia about Calistoga. The man who named Calistoga had his words reversed --he wanted to say Saratoga California instead he said Calistoga Salfornia (Laughter)! It stuck. I also brought in a book that I’ve put together to help in an auction that is going to be at the First Unitarian church. I am donating/auctioning one of my portraits, so I put together a book of portrait samples.

Linda: I’ve made a firm decision to paint in watercolor.  I have done this recent painting in all in black and white. I think backlighting can have some different meanings.

Tom: I like backlighting, in particular the Masters backlighting. I prefer a light to be on a subject from the front. However, I have brought in a painting that is somewhat backlit.

Dotty: It is hard not to love backlighting! I look for it. I find that it provides a good contrast and will usually make a dynamic painting. I have returned from the plein air convention so I am showing you a painting I did there in Tucson. I am also showing you another 2nd plein air painting... (both backlit).

Joanne: I like backlighting. When something is backlit some of the detail of the backlit object is lost. However, you can make create the illusion of detail with temperature shifts. You can turn the form even though it is darker. I am showing several examples.

Ward: I like backlighting. I am showing a recent painting that I did of a crustacean. I continue my work with Brush-o! 

Jerry: I am backlit standing here in front of this window! There is certainly lots of backlighting in the desert. I am showing this painting where the subject kind of melted because of the bright light behind it. I like what Dianne said about how the object is no longer an object so much as it is air. I am also showing another painting that I did of Joshua tree. This is the opposite of backlit-- all the light came from the front in this case.

Kristina: I like backlighting a lot and had the revelation that many of my sold paintings were backlit! I am showing an example of one of my backlit paintings.

Annie: I don’t have a lot to say about backlighting, but I sure like the examples in this meeting. I brought in a sample of dappled lighting. I like strong indication of light in all paintings.

Charlie: I have kind of a dislike for those religious paintings --you know the ones where something is bathed in light (in a contrived way)?  Diane’s painting shows that you can make some sophisticated decisions and almost get lost in the atmosphere.

Jeanie: I brought in a recent painting….(and it so happens that it is backlit!)

Jeanne: I have taken a trip to Spain. I went to Spain specifically to see and experience the Sorolla museum and instead I fell in love with Valesquez! (laughter)! I am showing you the Sorolla catalog and I also brought in two recent plein air paintings.

Susan: I brought a sample backlit painting that I did as a demo in a class. It was done in acrylic. I am also showing a painting that I have had made into a "print" (It is actually printed directly onto a cradled panel). This is a painting that I had sold to someone a very long time ago and it was returned to me recently when the owner became incapacitated. At the same time I had a Facebook "exhibit" (and this painting was chosen to be displayed). A man on Facebook contacted me and bought this very same painting from me! (I've sold the same painting now--twice).

Tedd: I brought in the painting that is up there on the wall-- it is called "After Dark". It is an example of backlighting. I went to the plein air conference. I did these two paintings on gessoed paper. While I was painting a man came up on a motorcycle and said: "oh MAN! that looks really good!"  (laughter)! 

Eunice: I like backlighting too. I brought in a series of girls that I did from Dr. Khanh's copyright free photographs. (Thanks, Khanh)! I found out I don’t really like working so much an 8 x 10. (Editor's note: sorry Eunice I missed photographing some pictures (?)---Please send if you can).

Sharon: I started to come here last week, but the traffic was so terrible I gave up and turned around and went home! (Laughter)! Well, I am showing you a painting that I did recently of my granddaughter and her dog. I also painted this portrait that I did in Peggy Kroll Roberts workshop.

Sandy: I am watercolorist. My husband was a muralist. He died two years ago. I contacted Celeste and asked if I could share his photographs that he had taken for many of his murals with you. (I know plein air painters sometimes work from photographs and my hope is that these photos might be of use to you). My husband also took a plein air workshop with Thomas Kitts. I brought in two of his paintings that he painted then. My husband's name is Larry Kangas.  (Editor’s Note: thank you, Sandy for your very generous gift.  So thoughtful of you! Many of the photos were taken today. We’ll bring the rest not taken today back in so that they all get distributed).
http://www.muralz.com

Anna: I did this painting in several sittings -- a view of the Willamette towards Portland. I went to the plein air conference. We had to do backlit paintings because of the wind! There was no choice because it was so windy, an umbrella wouldn’t have worked. I am also showing several other examples of backlit paintings.

Announcements:

Northwest Pastel Society 30th Annual International Open Exhibit
Dates
5/7/2016 - 6/11/2016
Reception: 5/7/2016  2-4pm
American Art Company
1126 Broadway
Tacoma, WA 98402-3510

Mike Porter: The photos remind me…if you are friends with me on Facebook you can use any of my photographs from hikes that I do --I will give them to you copyright free. (Just send me an email that you are going to do it).

Joanne: Paul Missal will give a talk next Wednesday at the Blackfish gallery at 7 PM.
http://padaoregon.org/events

There is room at Fine art Saturday at the Troy.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1695576667380902/

Anna Lancaster
Affolter Gallery
325 NE Evans
McMinnville, Oregon 97128
Phone:(503) 835-1610
The Affolter Gallery has 3rd Saturday events from 5:00 - 8:00 PM

Cannon Beach Art  Gallery Group Spring unveiling: (May 6-8)

That is all for today it was a little noisy in the restaurant today! thank you for your cooperation with speaking up and standing up.


Next meeting is Thursday, May 5, suggested table topic: Finished and unfinished….When is a painting “finished” to you? Do you have trouble knowing where and when to finish? What do you have to say on this subject? Let’s Discuss!

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