Meeting Notes, August 17, 2017

At todays meeting: Judith, Paula, Becky, Chris Rectenwald (new), Thomas, Vicki, Stephanie, Tim, Jeanie, Brenda, Kathy, Kristina, Eunice, Tom, Annie, Eunice, Joanne and me, Celeste

Todays topic: Grays and neutrals, what do you know about them? Do you have suggestions?

Celeste: I read recently in Sovek's book that your grays should be your own.. I did an exercise where I mixed grays using my usual palette. I'm showing some of my daily paintings where gray is apparent.

Kristina: For me, I usually decide my "dominant" color and then I make the grays lean this way or that (to support the dominant color). 

Kathy: I am showing this pastel that I did in Bend. I do like color--but I'm aware that color on it's own will look "too much". Paintings need neutrals.

Joanne K: Recently I had leftover paint that was mixed together into a pile--on it's own it looked like baby poop! (Laughter)! But, as soon as I put a Portland Gray next to it I saw that it was a viable color...it was actually beautiful. I had such faith in this, I painted with the "baby poop" and cool gray and the painting was successful. "Relationship" is everything. I'm showing recent plein air paintings (nocturnes).

Brenda: It's important to know which color mixtures will naturally "mute" a color. For example, to make purple you mix blue and red, but which types of blues and reds will provide the most saturated version and which will provide the "grayer" version? You know, right? I am showing a painting that incorporates colorful grays.

Jeanie: I've collected a lot of Torrit Grays from Gamblin...but only recently used them in my painting. I found it to be surprisingly useful.

Tim: I do often think a lot about natural earth type colors and which way to bend them. I am showing a painting that I did from a reference I had from the Tilbury event. It's watercolor. Also, I am showing a little painting that I did as a greeting card for an elderly person. She loves those wind machine things and I tried to emulate that kind of happy movement. 

Stephanie: I remember the story Celeste told about Ovanes Berbarian telling a student (with his heavy Russian accent): "You have no Grace! You have no Grace!" and this made the woman leave the classroom in tears. Later it was determined that he was saying "You have no Grays!" (Laughter)! Torrit gray is different every year. Some years it seems to lean cool, others it seems to lean warm. I like experimenting with it and I like using Titanium Buff on my palette (a warm white). I'm showing two paintings, one is certainly not gray!

Vicki: I know that you are supposed to mix up big batches of all your colors to give you "mud"--very useful, I know. But,  I've done it--only to run out of the pile before I was ready. (Laughter)! How are you supposed to replicate that specific mud pile? (Laughter)! I'm showing my plein air paintings that show grays that support the other colors.

Becky: I didn't bring anything today, I am painting to get ready for an exhibit. I really like the combination of Transparent red oxide and Thalo blue...it makes an rich gray. Also, I like lemon yellow and purple together. Another appealing gray.

Paula: Pastelists know that when you layers over other colors...you are "automatically" graying things. I am showing a painting from when we had the smoky conditions. I am showing another painting from Villa Catalana. I also brought this book in to share, a book about Edward Seago. He used grays so effectively!

Chris Rectenwald (New)!: I've read your blog for a long time...and I thought today is the day to join you --in-person! (Welcome, Chris)! in 2008 I went back to school, to PNCA. One of my teachers Jerry Sumpter told us "if you get the value right, the color can't be wrong". I am showing a painting I did in his class. I liked it in this neutral state, so I left it this way.

Tom D: I have considered both the negatives and positives of gray. I'm not sure on which side I fall. (Laughter)! I try to use grays in the distance. I am showing a recent plein air painting.

Annie: I saw an exhibit of quilts once...they were shown in a darkened gray room. Because of that they looked even more colorful. If they had been shown any other way they wouldn't have had the same impact. When I came here to Oregon, I was struck but how the autumn foliage looked against the gray skies. I am showing some recent studies.

Eunice: There are lots of grays that you can purchase to put on your palette. For example, Scott Christensen uses Versari. David Dunlop is going to be at the Attic Gallery. (see specifics in announcements below).

Thomas K: I have recently put grays on my palette.  Lately I am less concerned about the color of something and more concerned about the color that surrounds it. I've also put umber, sienna and ochre back onto my palette. When you place neutrals next to a color ---that's where the magic happens.  I wanted to show you a painting that I own that was done by Haidee Jo Summers. She used grays so masterfully in this painting. Also, I am showing a "in-progress" painting of a broken tree. I'll use retouch varnish on this before the next session. 

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Tim Young brought some art books to give away this morning (thanks, Tim)! Among them was this book(below) that Thomas Kitts told us was one of the best books he has ever read. (Don't be put off by the esoteric title).



Announcements:

Joanne Radmilovich Kollman Life Session OSA Friday, August 18, 1-4pm with model Crystal
http://www.oregonsocietyofartists.com/classes-and-workshops/classes

Joanne Radmilovich Kollman: Fresh Flower Saturday at OSA 9-12  (August 19)
(It is ok to arrive at 10 if that fits your schedule better)
http://www.oregonsocietyofartists.com/classes-and-workshops/classes

Brenda Boylan Pastel series (at OSA): Fall class is currently filled. Registration has begun for Winter session. Brenda is also teaching in San Clemente
For all classes/workshops go HERE

See David Dunlap at Attic Gallery (Camas, WA), Reception Sept 1.
http://www.atticgallery.com/home.html

August 23, Field Trip! Next Wednesday...we are meeting at Maryhill Museum. Arrange to car pool independently. Leave Portland at 10:15-10:30 to arrive at Maryhill around 12:15-12:30---we'll see the Pacific NW Plein Air show and have a bite in the Cafe. After that, see the rest of the Museum or check out the grounds. (If you are a participant in the show your badge will get you in for free. Here are admission details: (Mention 2 for one on Wednesday and get the 2 for one rate):
http://www.maryhillmuseum.org/visit/hours-admissions
http://www.maryhillmuseum.org/pleinair

"Painting for the Moment" Workshop with Michael Lindstrom*, August 26 and 27 (Vancouver, WA)
http://michaellindstromartist.com/workshops (*Za Vue and I are taking this)!

Pastel Show at OSA continues to August 30: http://www.oregonsocietyofartists.com

Classes at OSAhttp://www.oregonsocietyofartists.com/classes-and-workshops/classes

Kitts' recent Drawing for the Plein Air Painter Workshop was a huge hit. He will do another in the future.
Other workshops with Thomas Kitts
http://www.thomaskitts.com/p/blog-page_22.html

Online Mentoring Askanartist (Thomas Kitts): https://www.askanartist.com

Monday, August 28, beginning 10:30am "The Paint BIG Paint-Out" (bring the biggest canvas* you have--we're all going BIG)! This will be on Sauvie Island...specific location to be announced. *Also, smart to bring big brushes and lots of paint.

Next Meeting: Thursday: August 24. Suggested table topic: The Eclipse! Tell us your eclipse story...what was your eclipse experience (and did drawing/painting play any part)? (Remember, do not look directly at the eclipse...but! there will be bonuses for anyone who manages to translate the experience into visual art). As always, the topic is not mandatory for participation in the meeting, just continue to bring whatever you are currently working on (any subject matter).

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